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  • Gen Y Dental Trauma Education for Dental Students: Real-Time, Interactive and Leading Edge

    Product not yet rated Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Yuli Berlin-Broner, DMD | A discussion will address specific challenges that educators face in the classroom when teaching dental trauma. During the session, incorporation of technological aids will be demonstrated, and finally, the audience will learn some useful ‘take-home’ methods to enhance dental trauma education.

    CE: 0.75

    Description: Millennials (also known as Generation Y) are a generational demographic cohort. The Millennial generation is generally characterized by an increased use and familiarity with communications, media, and digital technology. Adopting classroom teaching and curricula to the specific interests and skills of this generation poses a challenge in dental schools’ settings. Dental 2 traumatology is a complex topic and requires multi-disciplinary understanding and comprehensive knowledge. Using various innovative and dynamic techniques for classroom teaching might improve the participation and cooperation of the new generation of learners and thus improve the overall educational outcomes of dental traumatology education. Apart from learning about the fascinating differences between generations, the audience will become familiarized with the unique characteristics of Generation Y dental students. A discussion will address specific challenges that educators face in the classroom when teaching dental trauma. During the session, incorporation of technological aids will be demonstrated, and finally, the audience will learn some useful ‘take-home’ methods to enhance dental trauma education.

    At the conclusion, participants should be able to: 

    - Define generation Y and the characteristics of dental students in Gen Y.
    - Discuss the challenges educators face within dental trauma education.
    - Demonstrate the use of technological aids in the classroom to enhance dental trauma education.

    Yuli Berlin-Broner, DMD

    Dr. Yuli Berlin-Broner is the former acting head of the Division of Endodontics, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry at the University of Alberta, Canada. Dr. Broner received her DMD degree from Tel Aviv University and completed her Post Graduate Program in Endodontics at the Hebrew University. She is currently perusing a master’s in Oral Biology. Her research focuses are the relationship between oral and general health. Dr. Broner has published several articles in the international professional journals, and she is active in knowledge dissemination by lecturing nationally and internationally.

    Yuli Berlin-Broner, DMD

    I declare that I have no proprietary, financial, or other personal interest of any nature or kind in any product, service, course, and/or company, or in any firm beneficially associated therewith, that will be discussed or considered during the proposed presentation.

  • Acute and Chronic Pain in Trauma Patients

    Product not yet rated Contains 2 Component(s)

    Eli Eliav, DMD, MSc, PhD | This presentation will discuss diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic pain, as well as potential mechanisms for the transition from acute to chronic pain. Challenging cases and findings from recent studies will be presented.

    CE: 0

    Description:Pain following trauma to the dental and supporting tissues is common, and in fact is even expected to occur. The pain may be present immediately after or develop within a few days following the injury. Tooth injury may also indirectly affect other orofacial structures such as the muscles of mastication and the temporomandibular joint and induce pains. The pain intensity does not always correlate with the injury extent. In most cases, the pain will recede following dental and routine palliative treatment, as soon as healing of the affected tissue occurs. In a small number of cases the pain persists beyond healing, and occasionally may lead to misdiagnosis and additional unnecessary dental treatment. This presentation will discuss diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic pain, as well as potential mechanisms for the transition from acute to chronic pain. Challenging cases and findings from recent studies will be presented.

    At the conclusion, participants should be able to:

    - Describe treatment options for acute and chronic posttraumatic orofacial pain
    - Discuss differential diagnosis of posttraumatic orofacial pain conditions
    - Describe the mechanisms involved in pain transition from acute to chronic


    Eli Eliav, DMD, MSc, PhD

    Dr. Eliav is a professor and the Director of the Eastman Institute for Oral Health at the University of Rochester Medical Center and the Vice Dean for Oral Health within its School of Medicine and Dentistry. Dr. Eliav was previously the Chair of the Department of Diagnostic Sciences, the Director of the Center for Temporomandibular Disorders and Orofacial Pain and Carmel Endowed chair in Algesiology at Rutgers School of Dental Medicine, part of Rutgers University. Eli earned his Dental Degree (1991), MSc (1995) and PhD (2004) from the Hebrew University and Hadassah in Jerusalem. He specialized in Oral Medicine at the Hebrew University, Hadassah Jerusalem, Israel (1991-1995) and trained in Clinical and Basic Science Research Program in the National Institute of Health Bethesda, Maryland, USA (1995-1997). Since 2008 he is the Editor in Chief of Quintessence International. Dr. Eliav published numerous research and clinical manuscripts in scientific and clinical journals. His research is focusing on orofacial pain, quantitative sensory testing, neuropathic pain, pain modulation, transition from acute to chronic pain and the role of inflammation in Neuropathic pain.

    Eli Eliav, DMD, MSc, PhD

    I declare that I have proprietary, financial, or other personal interest of any nature or kind in any product, service, course, and/or company, or in any firm beneficially associated therewith, that will be discussed or considered during the proposed presentation. Grants/Research: Celgene Cellular therapeutics, Johnson & Johnson, Ethicom, Depuy Mitek, Pharmos, Neurogense | Honoarium: Edit in Cheif of Quintessence International 

  • Surgical Treatment Options in Young Patients Where Traumatized Teeth Cannot be Preserved

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    Simon Storgård-Jensen, DDS, MSD | The prognosis after traumatic dental injury is most often excellent. However, especially after intrusions and avulsions, an elevated risk of dento-alveolar ankylosis may be observed. Untreated, ankylotic teeth may end up in severe infraposition, compromising neighboring teeth and vertical growth of the alveolar process. Infection-related resorption may also lead to loss of previously traumatized teeth in growing individuals.

    CE: 0

    Description:The prognosis after traumatic dental injury is most often excellent. However, especially after intrusions and avulsions, an elevated risk of dento-alveolar ankylosis may be observed. Untreated, ankylotic teeth may end up in severe infraposition, compromising neighboring teeth and vertical growth of the alveolar process. Infection-related resorption may also lead to loss of previously traumatized teeth in growing individuals. Techniques to reduce horizontal and vertical atrophy of the alveolar ridge will be presented and indications for each technique will be discussed. The techniques include: auto transplantation, decoronation, sandwich osteotomy with interpositional bone grafts, and socket preservation.

    At the conclusion, participants should be able to: 

    - List dento-alveolar trauma with an elevated risk of healing complications.
    - Describe clinical and radiographic signs of traumatized teeth that cannot be preserved.
    - Name techniques to reduce horizontal and vertical atrophy of the alveolar ridge.

    Simon Storgård-Jensen, DDS, MSD

    DDS from the School of Dentistry, University of Copenhagen 1996, certified specialist in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 2004. Research fellow at the Dept. of Oral Surgery and Stomatology, School of Dental Medicine, University of Bern from 2001-2014. Since 2005 consultant oral and maxillofacial surgeon at the Dept. of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Copenhagen University Hospital, where he is Head of the division treating patients with congenital missing teeth and early trauma-related tooth loss. In addition, he is director of the resident program. Former vice president of the Danish Association for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. Main research and focus areas are: Implant placement in young individuals with congenital missing teeth and trauma-related tooth loss, experimental evaluation and clinical performance of bone grafting materials, bone augmentation procedures, bone growth factors and surgical endodontics. The results have been presented worldwide in international lectures, books, and several publications in peer reviewed journals.

    Simon Storgård-Jensen, DDS, MSD

    I declare that I have proprietary, financial, or other personal interest of any nature or kind in any product, service, course, and/or company, or in any firm beneficially associated therewith, that will be discussed or considered during the proposed presentation. Consulant: Providers of workshops for Nusule corwns and Honoarium for time to deliver training. 

  • Timing of Implant Treatment after Traumatic Dental Injury

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    Simon Storgård-Jensen, DDS, MSD| Trauma-related tooth loss often occurs in growing individuals. Strategies to determine the safe time and ideal conditions for implant placement will be presented, as well as different temporary solutions.

    CE: 0

    Description: Trauma-related tooth loss often occurs in growing individuals. It is well documented that placement of dental implants in the alveolar ridge before cessation of growth will lead to 2 gradual infraposition of the implant. Strategies to determine the safe time and ideal conditions for implant placement will be presented. Also, different temporary solutions will be discussed. Timing of implant placement may also be an issue in adult patients. Advantages and disadvantages of immediate, early, and delayed implant placement will be discussed and related to the predictability of the implant treatment - functionally as well as aesthetically.

    At the conclusion, participants should be able to: 

    - Recognize the risk of placing implants in growing individuals.

    - Describe methods to evaluate skeletal and cranio-facial maturity.

    - List implant placement protocols related to the time passed after tooth loss.

    Simon Storgård-Jensen, DDS, MSD

    I declare that I have proprietary, financial, or other personal interest of any nature or kind in any product, service, course, and/or company, or in any firm beneficially associated therewith, that will be discussed or considered during the proposed presentation. Consulant: Providers of workshops for Nusule corwns and Honoarium for time to deliver training.

  • Decoronation and the Endodontist’s Role in the Preservation of Alveolar Bone in Children and Teenagers

    Product not yet rated Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Nestor Cohenca, D.D.S., F.I.A.D.T. | New approaches for the treatment of ankylosed teeth, including decoronation and bone augmentation for the preservation of alveolar ridge prior to the implant-based prosthetic reconstruction will be thoroughly discussed and illustrated.

    CE: 0.75

    Description: Replacement resorption and ankylosis are frequently diagnosed following avulsion and severe intrusive luxation. The treatment of ankylosed permanent incisors following dental trauma present a clinical challenge particularly when involve a growing child due to the high risk of infraposition and undevelopment of the alveolar bone. New approaches for the treatment of ankylosed teeth, including decoronation and bone augmentation for the preservation of alveolar ridge prior to the implant-based prosthetic reconstruction will be thoroughly discussed and illustrated.

    At the conclusion, participants should be able to: 

    - Discuss dentoalveolar traumatic injuries and their complications in growing patients.

    - Recognize effective strategies for the preservation and augmentation of the alveolar ridge for final prosthetic rehabilitation.

    - Develop a comprehensive approach for the treatment of ankylosed teeth.

    Nestor Cohenca, D.D.S., F.I.A.D.T.

    Dr. Cohenca completed the endodontic program at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem cum laude and received the Best Graduate Student Award. He then served 11 years on faculty at the school while maintaining a private practice limited to endodontics. From 2003 to 2005 he served as a clinical assistant professor and coordinator of Trauma and Sports Dentistry at University of Southern California. Thereafter, Dr. Cohenca joined the University of Washington where he completed his endodontic certificate in 2008 and served as Tenured Professor of Endodontics and Pediatric Dentistry from 2005-2014. He served as Director of Endodontics and the Multidisciplinary Traumatology Unit at the School of Dentistry, the Center for Pediatric Dentistry, and Seattle Children’s Hospital. Currently he serves as Affiliate Professor at the University of Washington, Professor at Seattle Children’s hospital and maintains a private practice limited to Endodontics in Seattle and Kirkland, WA. He is a Diplomate of the Israel Board of Endodontics and the American Board of Endodontics. Dr. Cohenca is a Fellow of the IADT and received an honorary membership to Omicron Kappa Upsilon National Dental Honor Society. He has published more than 80 peer-reviewed articles, 10 chapters and a new book entitled “Disinfection of Root Canal Systems: The Treatment of Apical Periodontitis”. Cohenca currently serves as President of the International Association of Dental Traumatology. Dr. Cohenca provided more than 200 lectures around the world and is well known as one of the experts in dental traumatology, Endo-Pedo related topics, vital pulp therapy, CBCT and root canal disinfection.

    Nestor Cohenca, D.D.S., F.I.A.D.T.

    I declare that I have no proprietary, financial, or other personal interest of any nature or kind in any product, service, course, and/or company, or in any firm beneficially associated therewith, that will be discussed or considered during the proposed presentation.

  • Evaluation and Diagnosis of the Traumatized Dentition

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Garry L. Myers, D.D.S. | Correctly identifying the type of dental injury sustained along with establishing baseline diagnostic information will be the first step in providing the best management of care for any traumatic dental injury.

    CE: 0.75

    Description: The traumatized dentition encompasses a broad spectrum of dental injury classifications. Even when immediate treatment needs to be rendered, the clinician must always begin with an initial assessment of the injured patient and dentition that results in a preliminary diagnosis. This initial assessment or evaluation process for traumatic dental injuries should include a) obtaining a thorough history of the events related to the injury itself, b) an initial clinical exam followed by a more thorough evaluation to include pulpal and periapical diagnostic testing, c) a comprehensive radiographic exam and d) establishment of a preliminary pulpal and periapical diagnosis. Once this has been completed along with any immediate emergency care, a long-term treatment plan can be formulated and followed. Understanding the differences of how traumatized teeth respond to diagnostic testing when compared to teeth with healthy pulps is essential. This presentation is geared toward outlining a comprehensive, but efficient, evaluation process done in an orderly and systematic manner. Correctly identifying the type of dental injury sustained along with establishing baseline diagnostic information will be the first step in providing the best management of care for any traumatic dental injury.

    At the conclusion, participants should be able to: 

    - Identify key components of obtaining an accurate history related to the traumatic dental injury

    - Develop a systematic and orderly sequence for performing a clinical exam of the traumatized dentition to include diagnostic testing.

    - Describe the benefits of various radiographic methods for evaluating the traumatized dentition

    Garry L. Myers, D.D.S.

    Dr. Garry Myers currently serves as the graduate endodontic program director at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Virginia. He completed his dental school education at the University of Texas Health Science Center/ at San Antonio in 1985. Following graduation Dr. Myers entered the USAF where he served for four years as a general dentist before entering the endodontic residency program at Wilford Hall Medical Center at Lackland AFB, also in San Antonio. In 1998 after serving on active duty for 13 years, Dr. Myers left the USAF to enter private practice in Olympia, Washington where he practiced for the next 16 years. In the summer of 2014, full time education entered the picture when Dr. Myers accepted a position at VCU where he now works. Dr. Myers has been active in organized dentistry having served as the president of the Washington State Association of Endodontists in 2006-07 and he is currently the president of the American Association of Endodontists having been involved over the last nine years with various committees of the AAE as well as serving on the Board of Directors. He has spoken internationally in both Japan and Guatemala as well as serving as a scientific poster judge at the IADT meeting in Brisbane, Australia.

    Garry L. Myers, D.D.S.

    I declare that I have no proprietary, financial, or other personal interest of any nature or kind in any product, service, course, and/or company, or in any firm beneficially associated therewith, that will be discussed or considered during the proposed presentation.

  • In the Dental Implant Era – Why We Bother Saving Teeth?

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Liran Levin, DMD | This lecture will provide a reevaluation of our paradigms, beliefs and knowledge regarding both tooth prognosis evaluation and long-term implant success according to the currently available knowledge. We, as dental professionals, should avoid basing our treatment planning on thoughts and beliefs and stick as much as possible to evidence-based practice.

    CE: 1.00

    Description: Perio-prosthetic implant treatment plan is gaining popularity with high perceived survival and success rates. Replacing a tooth with an implant is usually based on tooth prognosis evaluation and its comparison to the anticipated long-term implant survival. Different approaches for determining tooth prognosis were described in the literature. Over the past decade, the use of osseointegrated implants as a foundation for prosthetic replacement of missing teeth has become widespread. However, there is an increasing trend toward replacing diseased teeth with dental implants. In dental trauma patients, it seems that a lot of efforts are sometimes needed to save or preserve a tooth and it is tempting to turn to implant placement. This lecture will provide a reevaluation of our paradigms, beliefs and knowledge regarding both tooth prognosis evaluation and long-term implant success according to the currently available knowledge. We, as dental professionals, should avoid basing our treatment planning on thoughts and beliefs and stick as much as possible to evidence-based practice.

    At the conclusion, participants should be able to: 

    - Describe the prognostic systems for teeth and implants

    - Explain treatment alternatives for post-traumatic tooth injuries.

    - Apply Evidence-Based approach to determine best treatment options following oral trauma.

    Liran Levin, DMD

    Prof. Dr. Liran Levin is the Head of the Periodontology Division at the Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta. He is also a visiting professor at the Harvard School of Dental Medicine. Prof. Levin received his DMD degree with distinction at Tel Aviv University and completed his Post Graduate Periodontology Program at Rambam Health Care Campus. He received his Periodontology Specialist Certificate from the European Federation of Periodontology as well as a Fellow of the Royal College of Dentists of Canada in Periodontology. Prof. Liran Levin has published more than 230 articles and book chapters in the international professional literature and is involved in research mainly in periodontology, dental implants and dental trauma. He is lecturing extensively internationally in the fields of dental implants and periodontal diseases. Prof. Levin has served as The Chairman of the Ethics in Dental Research Committee of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR). He is currently the secretary of the International Association for Dental Traumatology (IADT).

    Liran Levin, DMD

    I declare that I have no proprietary, financial, or other personal interest of any nature or kind in any product, service, course, and/or company, or in any firm beneficially associated therewith, that will be discussed or considered during the proposed presentation.

  • Microbiological Aspects of Traumatic Injuries

    Product not yet rated Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Ashraf F. Fouad, D.D.S., M.S. | This presentation will examine the microbiology of traumatic injuries, focusing on the likely sources of pulp bacteria, the types of bacteria present, the most effective methods of treatment and the outcomes of these approaches.

    CE: 1.00

    Description: Traumatic injuries are a major etiological factor of the devitalization of the dental pulp. The risk of pulp necrosis is less for immature teeth than mature teeth, presumably due to an increased vascular supply and potential for revascularization in immature teeth. Moreover, diagnosis of pulp necrosis following a traumatic injury is complicated by the fact that pulp sensibility testing in not reliable for up to three months. Therefore, the diagnosis may involve 2 prolonged monitoring of patients, and may rely on the development of apical periodontitis or infection-related resorption, which are signs of an established microbial biofilm. This microbial biofilm frequently develops in the absence of direct communication between the pulp space and the external surface. This presentation will examine the microbiology of traumatic injuries, focusing on the likely sources of pulp bacteria, the types of bacteria present, the most effective methods of treatment and the outcomes of these approaches.

    At the conclusion, participants should be able to: 

    - Define generation Y and the characteristics of dental students in Gen Y.
    - Discuss the challenges educators face within dental trauma education.
    - Demonstrate the use of technological aids in the classroom to enhance dental trauma education.

    Ashraf F. Fouad, D.D.S., M.S.

    Dr. Fouad obtained his DDS, Certificate of Endodontics and MS at the University of Iowa. He served as Assistant, then Associate Professor of Endodontology at the University of Connecticut Health Center from 1992 – 2004, and as Chair of the Department of Endodontics, Prosthodontics and Operative Dentistry at the University of Maryland, from 2005 – 2015. He has been Freedland Distinguished Professor and Chair of Endodontics at the University of North Carolina since 2016. Dr. Fouad has published over 70 manuscripts, 20 textbook chapters, over 120 abstracts, and edited and co-authored the textbooks: Endodontic Microbiology (now in its second edition) and the fifth edition of Endodontics: Principles and Practice. He is a Diplomate and Past President of the American Board of Endodontics, and an Associate Editor of the Journal of Endodontics.

    Ashraf F. Fouad, D.D.S., M.S.

    I declare that I have no proprietary, financial, or other personal interest of any nature or kind in any product, service, course, and/or company, or in any firm beneficially associated therewith, that will be discussed or considered during the proposed presentation.

  • Splinting in Dental Trauma

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Bill Kahler, BDSc, FRACDS, MScDent, DClinDent, PhD, MRACDS, FICD, FADI, FPFA | Dental material science has continued to provide new materials and amongst them the development of resin activated glass ionomer cement suitable for orthodontic bracket cementation has allowed the development of an alternative simplified splinting regimen for traumatised teeth which offers ease of application and removal with minimal or no iatrogenic damage to enamel.

    CE: 0.75

    Description: With advances in the understanding of healing processes of the periodontium, pulp and alveolar bone following various injuries, the role of splinting has become relatively well 2 defined. This is generally reflected in the guidelines for trauma management published by the International Association of Dental Traumatology. While the widespread use of composite resin as an adhesive in various functional/flexible splinting systems has over many years allowed ease of application, removal of the material is not only time consuming but more seriously is accompanied by minor or major iatrogenic damage to enamel. Dental material science has continued to provide new materials and amongst them the development of resin activated glass ionomer cement suitable for orthodontic bracket cementation has allowed the development of an alternative simplified splinting regimen for traumatised teeth which offers ease of application and removal with minimal or no iatrogenic damage to enamel.

    At the conclusion, participants should be able to: 

    - Define generation Y and the characteristics of dental students in Gen Y.
    - Discuss the challenges educators face within dental trauma education.
    - Demonstrate the use of technological aids in the classroom to enhance dental trauma education.

    Bill Kahler, BDSc, FRACDS, MScDent, DClinDent, PhD, MRACDS, FICD, FADI, FPFA

    Bill Kahler maintains a full-time specialist private practice restricted to Endodontics in Brisbane, Australia. He works in a dedicated trauma clinic at Metro South for Queensland Health. In addition, Bill holds an honorary Associate Professor title at the University of Queensland. He graduated DClinDent (Endo) from the University of Adelaide and has a PhD from the University of Sydney as well as numerous Fellowships. Bill has published more than 55 papers in international dental, material science and engineering journals. His papers are cited as reference texts by the American Association of Endodontists and the International Association of Dental Traumatology for the treatment of dental trauma and regenerative endodontic procedures. Bill is a contributing author for book chapters on endodontic outcomes and dental trauma. He has lectured extensively nationally and internationally and has numerous international research collaborations. Bill also volunteers in remote aboriginal clinics as a general dentist.

    Bill Kahler, BDSc, FRACDS, MScDent, DClinDent, PhD, MRACDS, FICD, FADI, FPFA

    I declare that I have no proprietary, financial, or other personal interest of any nature or kind in any product, service, course, and/or company, or in any firm beneficially associated therewith, that will be discussed or considered during the proposed presentation.

  • The Law: Critical Considerations for the Clinician and the Trauma Patient

    Product not yet rated Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Alan H. Gluskin, D.D.S. | This presentation will be taken from a clinician’s perspective and will review issues concerning the standard of care, exceptions to that standard, record keeping requirements, communication and confidentiality of patient information, the doctrines of informed consent and informed refusal, referral duties, abuse reporting duties, and obligations regarding iatrogenic trauma patients while providing examples of case management and documentation.

    CE: 0.75

    Description: Trauma patients present a number of unique legal issues for the modern dental practitioner as compared with regularly scheduled patients. At the same time, fundamental legal principles apply to all patients regardless of the origin or nature of the dental condition presented. Therefore, the prudent dental provider should have a working knowledge of current dental law and the special issues presented in cases of trauma. This presentation will be taken from a clinician’s perspective and will review issues concerning the standard of care, exceptions to that standard, record keeping requirements, communication and confidentiality of patient information, the doctrines of informed consent and informed refusal, referral duties, abuse reporting duties, and obligations regarding iatrogenic trauma patients while providing examples of case management and documentation. In the United States, many aspects of dental law can vary from state to state. Therefore, this presentation will offer general principles and will endeavor to point out areas where the practitioner would be well advised to consult his / her local resources, such as dental societies, professional liability carriers, state licensing agencies, or attorneys with expertise in dental law in any particular state. Rigorous attention to detailed and accurate records remains the best method for avoiding claims of substandard care. Quality evidence gathering, and maintenance are essential and should include use of both radiographic and photographic imaging. Maintaining records and graphic evidence require staff whose training is routinely evaluated and updated for quality, accuracy, and compliance with office policy. Record keeping should be uniform for staff and dentists and should always be reviewed by dentists when entered by staff. The differential diagnostic process should be well documented, unless there is a significant urgency of treatment, and then the nature and environment of the trauma must be well documented. Once treatment plans are designed and discussed with the patient, parent, or guardian, informed consent and/or refusal should be documented. Staying current with the legal requirements for trauma patients will allow today’s dental practitioner to enjoy the rewards of helping such patients and still avoid the risks of a claim of substandard care.

    At the conclusion, participants should be able to: 

    - Describe the fundamental legal principles that apply to all patients regardless of the origin or nature of the dental condition.

    - Differentiate the basic steps of documentation to be taken in cases of dental trauma, in order to save teeth and avoid legal consequences.

    - Assess and promptly refer dental trauma and oral-facial emergencies, which are beyond the scope of management in your dental practice.

    Alan H. Gluskin, D.D.S.

    Alan H. Gluskin DDS is currently Professor, Department of Endodontics, Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry, University of the Pacific in San Francisco, California. He is at present a Fellow of the International College of Dentists and the American College of Dentists. Dr. Gluskin is a member of numerous societies including the American Association of Endodontists, the American Dental Association and the San Francisco Dental Society. He has served on the Educational Affairs Committee and the Research and Scientific Affairs Committee of the AAE. and was General Chair for AAE10 and AAE18. Dr. Gluskin is presently on the Executive Board of Directors of the AAE as Vice-President, and additionally functions on the editorial boards of the Journal of Endodontics and the International Journal of Endodontics. Dr. Gluskin is the 2017 recipient of the University of the Pacific’s Eberhardt Teacher-Scholar Award. He is co-editor of the textbooks Decision Making in Dental Treatment Planning and Practical Lessons in Endodontic Treatment.

    Alan H. Gluskin, D.D.S.

    I declare that I have no proprietary, financial, or other personal interest of any nature or kind in any product, service, course, and/or company, or in any firm beneficially associated therewith, that will be discussed or considered during the proposed presentation.